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Kerjaya Zaman K-Economy


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#1 rizal

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Posted 11 June 2002 - 11:43 AM

Zaman K Economy nanti..jom explore kerja jadi contract staff!

QUOTE
Size Does Matter In New Economy
COMPANIES in the new economy are likely to be leaner and trimmer,
operating with a core team of people on permanent-term and engaging
professionals on contract basis, according to experts from IBM think-tank.
IBM Global Services (IGS) Institute for Business Value (IBV) Asia Pacific leader
Dr Michael Loh and IBV Asia Pacific consultant Alan Lee believe that size does
matter for companies in the new economy, when competitiveness is dependent
on human capital. Loh said trimmer and slimmer companies are more agile to face
competition in the knowledge-based economy (k-economy).

“You don’t want to be carrying a baggage, a lot of extra weight, you need to be agile
and able to move with time,” he said in a recent interview with Business Times in
Kuala Lumpur. Singapore-based Loh envisions that companies in the future will
be lean with a blurred division of labour.

Multi-tasking will be the a norm; where a person could be doing several
different tasks and fulfilling several functions in a firm, he said
. He added
that multi-tasking has becoming an accepted way of working now. Less physical
facilities are required as the employees can work anywhere given the availability of phone lines,
fax machines and Internet facilities.

“But this concept is still difficult to accept as people are used to working
in the office or territory,”
he noted. Loh said companies in the future could can be
“virtual” as employees can work from anywhere across the globe, with constant
communication with others from different countries and time zones difference.
“It’s almost ‘boundary-less’; the processes are global and seamless.
“Business can be done anytime, in any country and it is not bound by conventional
restrictions of in space and time,” he said.

Characteristics of employees in the future?

Loh said employees will be knowledge workers (k-workers),
with a lot of independent workers working on contract basis to
the highest bidders (employers). “K-workers who are experts i
n their area of specialty, knowing that there is a need somewhere,
will make themselves available for say, 20 months and might spend
the next 15 months on vacation,” he said, describing the future life of
highly skilled k-workers
.

He said outsourcing will also be typical such as companies will are
no longer need to have a full-fledged pledge information technology (IT)
or human resource (HR) departments as the IT and HR tasks would be are
outsourced to other firms. “You may have an IT person or a HR person in
the company but not an IT or HR department
. “There will be organisations
out there who will do that for you,” he said.

Meanwhile, Lee said there will be many a lot of variations in the type of companies
in k-economy. He said some companies may need a small number of permanent staff
to ensure the smooth operation of the company. “There’ll probably be a core team which,
that no matter what happens, the company can still (function),”he said. The other group
will consist of is those who are hired on a temporary basis, who are needed by companies
to implement certain tasks. “These are highly leveraged and highly skilled k- workers…
you only need them for a certain period of time, like a year or two. They come in, they set up
whatever that needs to be set up and, at the same time, they train the core team,” he said.

The new working arrangement, which does not require workers to be in the office,
may be new in developing countries like Malaysia but it has already been implemented
by many firms in developed countries.

According to the International Herald Tribune (IHP), there are about 6.5 million people
working from their homes in the UK — a working arrangement which is facilitated by
telecommunications tool like telephone, fax and e-mail. Senior managers interviewed
in the IHP latest television programme, including those from large consulting firms like
PriceWaterhouseCoopers and Ernst & Young believed that work done by employees
who work from their homes are delivered on time and according to the budget.

The new working arrangement is benefits employers and workers particularly in large
cities such as London, which is typified by traffic congestion and as well as soaring
property prices and office rentals. While workers benefit in terms of significant drop
in commuting time and more time to spend with families, employers face lesser office
rental as less space is needed when some of the workforce work from home. In the
new economy, productivity is no longer measured by the total hours spent in the office.
At the firm level, the transformation into k-economy requires similar transformation in
the mindset of employers and managers. IBV’s Loh said the paradigm shift has to begin
at the top, where the top management has to instil knowledge management culture into
the organisation. He said the culture of knowledge management involves recognising
individuals for what they are best at. He said employers must encourage workers to be
better in things that they do, and should not beat them into a common set-up and drive
them to be worker bees.

Employers should not try to change their workers, he added.
“You don’t hire a pilot and make him sell bicycles,” he said, noting that
a lot of leadership training programmes and seminars for executives are
designed to make people manage in the same way. “If you try to change the
human nature, you are definitely going to fail. The concept of knowledge-management
is to recognise people (based) on what they bring to the table,” he said.

Loh also said that older employers or managers who are familiar used with
capital-based economy may find it difficult to embrace new business practices
in k-economy but he said the harsh reality will make them aware of the need
to change. “I believe that the harsh reality of the business should convince
them that it is important to firstly, analyse the business, and secondly,
to understand that if you were successful in the past, there is no guarantee
that your future will be successful too,” he said.

Loh said the last few years saw two rounds of economic downturn, which had
actually shifted the paradigm and moved everything back to zero. “The bad news
is that everybody is now on equal footing, and the good news is that it needs
a company which is a little more innovative than that others to be ahead of the
competition,” he concluded. Loh and Lee are from IBV, which is IBM’s
newly-established think-tank, which to provides intellectual database to
support IGS’ consulting activities. IGS, which is the consulting and outsourcing
arm of IBM, is the fastest growing division in IBM and the largest source of revenue


#2 Guest_zerrow_tw_*

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Posted 03 May 2003 - 09:46 PM

how abaut my life...........

#3 Guest_darkburst_*

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Posted 25 July 2003 - 10:02 AM

apa jadi ngan E-commerce skang nie ?? (e-perolehan ) ... camner nak survive kalu dah start K-Economy lak ?? :roll:

#4 Guest_sufian_*

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Posted 14 August 2003 - 11:42 PM

bukan ker dua2 tu adik beradik.....

#5 Guest_idzmieyz_*

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Posted 20 November 2003 - 10:30 AM

P/s: Kepada semua ahli.....lain kali kalau nak hantar mesej tu biar laaa... munasabah sikit...jangan laaa bagi soalan budak-budak......

kalau setakat nak dapat pangkat tinggi.....aku pun boleh bagi.....

Selamat Menyambut Aidil Fitri....Maaf Zahir & Batin.....

:twisted:

#6 Guest_chadtce_*

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Posted 21 November 2003 - 02:36 PM

QUOTE
P/s: Kepada semua ahli.....lain kali kalau nak hantar mesej tu biar laaa... munasabah sikit...jangan laaa bagi soalan budak-budak......

kalau setakat nak dapat pangkat tinggi.....aku pun boleh bagi.....

Selamat Menyambut Aidil Fitri....Maaf Zahir & Batin.....

:twisted:

Apsal aku nyirap bulan-bulan posa ni bila baca Strings macam ni ek? Tanya sama itu hud-hud...

#7 kureng

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Posted 13 June 2004 - 04:02 PM

QUOTE
Multi-tasking will be the a norm; where a person could be doing several
different tasks and fulfilling several functions in a firm, he said. He added
that multi-tasking has becoming an accepted way of working now. Less physical
facilities are required as the employees can work anywhere given the availability of phone lines, fax machines and Internet facilities


situasi camni rasenye dh banyak berlaku kat M'sia ni...
bukan kate different task..even sorang programmer/developer pon dh handle different project!! hehe

#8 Jagermeist_

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Posted 04 August 2006 - 10:02 AM

Its been almost 5 years since the article was posted.

K-economy and the K-workers are the most overused buzzword by our

previous PM and most highlighted by the media,K this and K that. But

have this country actually moved into the K-gear? Afraid not,our local

GLC's are supersized and 'obese'. Banks especially have excess

baggage by the thousands and where 3 person can do the job (provided

with automation to certain functions)300 are hired. Where is the culture

or Mobile workforce,as mobile and nimble as Navy SEALS DevGru,able

to be deployed anywhere in the world within 24 hours notice? That is not

possible when no clear direction from the senior management on being

a Knowledge Based Organization. Do not be mistaken for IT initiatives

like providing VPN etc for K masterplan. IT is merely a tool,not the end

to itself. Sure,GLC's may have spend millions in procuring latest

machines and giving laptop to all its employees under the false

pretence of making them mobile,but what use if they still need to be in

the office 5 days a week and work more than 12 hours a day? Why am I referring to GLC's on the subject of K-economy? Because they're the goverments own corporate line,unlike goverment agencies where decision making is centralize and it would take a parlimentary sitting even to decide which brand of lightbulbs to be used,GLC has the freedom to change themselves overnight. Telekom Malaysia spend RM9 million on corporate re-branding alone,RM9 million to change itself to TM without even having going through the bureucratic channels. How does a RM9 million re-branding makes TM a Knowledge Based Organization,go figure? Different can (expensive),content still high in excess fat (staff).
So far,in my limited observation,only multi-nationals have actually understood and put in practice what was preached by Tun Mahathir and what was most publicized by the media,a KBO. Companies like Motorola,Digi (Telenor),Accenture etc have deployed a successfull model of a KBO. Regardless wheter it was driven/inspired by a realization of the new economy or cost-cutting measures,these company operates with a 'lean' workforce,but output and value driven objectives.
So,another misundertood buzzword harped one to often but in praticality,zilch!

QUOTE(kureng @ Jun 13 2004, 04:02 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
situasi camni rasenye dh banyak berlaku kat M'sia ni...
bukan kate different task..even sorang programmer/developer pon dh handle different project!! hehe


Silap tuh,K-economy bukannya pada staff nye sahaja,tetapi lebih kepada organisasi itu secara menyeluruh. Even without K-economy,the workforce is already multi-tasking. Multi-tasking is a human behavior,not a new grandeur initiative.

Motorola Multimedia di Cyberjaya misalnya mempunyai lebih 500 staff,semuanya executive dan tiada clerical. HR&Admin hanyalah 1 orang,dah dialah bos dan dialah staff.

In K-economy,the most valuable resource that is to be optimize to yield maximum output is the staff. The concern is more on how does the staff adds or create value.

#9 rizal

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Posted 04 August 2006 - 10:26 AM

I think it will take longer time for Malaysian gov to really implement this.
Lagi la pulak dengan keadaan ekonomi dan politik sekarang, they afraid of taking unpopular decision. Lot of people will lose their jobs ditambah lagi dengan isu jobless graduates sekarang ni.

Office saya ada 2 orang sahaja HR & Admin.
0 IT staff --> semua outsource to IBM & HP.
Everything claims, payslip, leave approval,appraisal done online.

#10 Jagermeist_

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Posted 04 August 2006 - 10:45 AM

In the K-Economy or I prefer to call it the Gigabit world,TIME is no longer a bottomless-pit resource,in fact its a SCARE resources.

The longer the Malaysian goverment and all its instruments takes TIME to drive a project that will ensure this countries survivalibility,the faster it being push down the ranks by others like Vietnam,Singapore etc.

GLC's (where it applies) would best try to model thier entire operation the 'Dell Way'. In the new economy,only the core management is the 'company',the rest are profit driven 'merchaneries'. People must learn to 'share' resouces and knowledge. Empowering and decentralize is the key concept.

Tak taulah Mesia nih,sebut K-economy pandai...pegi jaja MSC sampai ke Stanford U and Oxford.. smile.gif.

#11 obelicks

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Posted 04 August 2006 - 02:53 PM

hey you're talking about Outsource not K-Ecomomy.. smile.gif

What is k-Economy anyway?

K is for knewledge isn't? so what about outsource?? outsource is there for edges.. smile.gif

#12 Jagermeist_

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Posted 04 August 2006 - 04:22 PM

QUOTE(obelicks @ Aug 4 2006, 02:53 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
hey you're talking about Outsource not K-Ecomomy.. smile.gif

What is k-Economy anyway?

K is for knewledge isn't? so what about outsource?? outsource is there for edges.. smile.gif


An economy characterised by the recognition of knowledge as a source of competitiveness, the increasing importance of science, research, technology and innovation in knowledge creation, and the use of computers and the Internet to generate, share and apply knowledge.

One of the characteristic of K-Economy is the 'virtual market place',therefore Dell business model is given as an example. A function such as R&D can be outsource then the results shared among the industry and improved among itself.

Edges? What edges?

K-Economy has little to do with IT,IT serves as a tool in K-Economy not dictate it. According to Peter Drucker,we have have laid too many pipelines for information to travel,just that not much of information is travelling in it anyway.

A K-Economy organization operations in a very lean manner,because everything which is not essential to the organization can be outsource to a company that is highly specialize in the discpline,and considered as a service. Therefore,the organization is left with only the sole task of adding more value to its services or product. For instance,IT. Companies today are seen as managing IT than managing themselves.

Allianz AG for instance spends 3 billion Euro (source: Allianz 2003 CIO Meeting in Singapore)to manage IT resources alone,and thier business is financial services. Whereas if it wanted to be a KBO,than it would find ways to reduce the cost of IT expenditure and focus its effort in developing better products in line with the customers needs and predict future trends as well.

Outsourcing is a function in an economy,but not an economy by itself.

Bank Negara for instance even has an appointed avsenior management personnel to hold the rank of Chief Knowledge Officer. Every department has an appointed Knowledge Officer. BNM has since try to transform itself into a knowledge based organization.

To understand how a CBO translates into a full fledge economy,you have to look at the bigger picture. A person,a department,a division,a company,an industry and finally the whole sector which represents an economy.

#13 obelicks

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Posted 04 August 2006 - 04:50 PM

Ala k-ekonomi term ajer..

more structured.. more knewledge and managed..
balik2 sama jer.. duit yang masuk tu penting bila banyak sangat process banyak teori banyak itu ini memang la bagus untuk ilmiah
tapi at the end.. $$$ juga yang akan nampak dan menang..
dan dipandang..
apa guna proses berjela kalau rugi memanjang..

#14 obelicks

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Posted 04 August 2006 - 05:02 PM

outsource is not main factorin k-economy although it's help..
k-ecomomy basically wel manage knewledge in ecomomy industry.. it's really doesn't stress out-source but more focus more manageable and shared accros organization..

but the value stress is Knewledge.. tangible and intabgible knewledge which reside in human activity.. managing knewledge is harder...




i belive it's once has been brough by tengku azman
http://202.186.86.35/special/online/interviews/tengku.html

#15 Jagermeist_

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Posted 04 August 2006 - 05:27 PM

QUOTE(obelicks @ Aug 4 2006, 04:50 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Ala k-ekonomi term ajer..

more structured.. more knewledge and managed..
balik2 sama jer.. duit yang masuk tu penting bila banyak sangat process banyak teori banyak itu ini memang la bagus untuk ilmiah
tapi at the end.. $$$ juga yang akan nampak dan menang..
dan dipandang..
apa guna proses berjela kalau rugi memanjang..


Yup,its just a term,but the concept is for real. Maybe kat sini,belom nampak the full effect of what K-Economy does or how does it benefit the economy at large,but other countries has successfully implemented it and now reaping the reward. So,its more than a term,its a working concept...an evolution just like the Industrial Economy some hundreds years ago when the steam engine was created.
Yes,the bottom line matters,but with knowledge management,it ensures the contiunity of the organization itself and won't just extinct when the pioneer has lone gone. Contoh,ada recorded document pasal camana budu atau lemang dibuat? Kalau hari ini mati semua orang2 buat lemang dan budu,lemang and budu will be extinct on the malay menu. Henry Ford may have long died and become plan fertilizers,but the company still exist and making billions. Why so? Theres a contiunity to its process.
Most American corporation are fond of process,hence they are process oriented organization. ExxonMobil misalnya menggunakan khidmat Price Water House Coopers in defining the entire operations of the company,for almost every function. SOP's,Work Instructions,Manual,Guidelines etc was written by PWC,ExxonMobil just had to hire people to fill in the processes. So,in 2002/3 Exxon Mobil ranked 1st in Fortune top 50 with accumulated asset worth more than $208,335.0 million. So,thier process oriented operations paid off after all wink.gif .
So kerjaya zaman K-Economy,nothing more in specific pun,just new terms added to the list of job function lexcicons like Knowledge Executive,Chief Knowledge Officer etc etc. Its just that in the K-Economy,a person gives more value to his work that he used to be for instance Michael Dell wasn't only a techie but he's now a Donald Trump of his own. He's a geek with the heart of an entrepeneur. In the old economy,job functions was specific and strict,but in K-Economy your job function cuts through the boundry,i.e multi-disclipine. Hence,top notch business school such as Harvard and Wharton are already offering an engineering MBA for engineers,or a Knowledge Management cum Engineering Degree.
The problem with this country is,things in the real world are moving as fast as the processor in thier PCs or Laptops. Hardly any local firms here adopts Six Sigma or even know what it is in the first place. To have an experience,one would usually need an exposure to large multinationals who brings in their processes to ensure they stay afloat in the new economy.

QUOTE(obelicks @ Aug 4 2006, 05:02 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
outsource is not main factorin k-economy although it's help..
k-ecomomy basically wel manage knewledge in ecomomy industry.. it's really doesn't stress out-source but more focus more manageable and shared accros organization..

but the value stress is Knewledge.. tangible and intabgible knewledge which reside in human activity.. managing knewledge is harder...
i belive it's once has been brough by tengku azman
http://202.186.86.35/special/online/interviews/tengku.html


Personally I don't think MIMOS should be an example of a KBO. If MIMOS was a real company in the market,it would have been forced to closed down,the staff retrenced and all BOD and management face the firing squad by the goverment inquiry board the likes of Kenneth Lay of Enron. In fact,Tengku Azman and MIMOS was under investigation by Bank Negara last year for mismanagement of goverment funds etc. Too many projects have failed from making a microchip to selling a re-branded laptop and PC's.

#16 obelicks

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Posted 08 August 2006 - 04:52 PM

get real

K-ecomomy based on what knewledge.. how knewledge is transfer and manage..

dengan kata lain macamna nak mengurus ilmu dari disimpan dalam kepala saja.. bend ayang nampak dan tak nampak.. benda yang drive sesuatu process aktivi dan bagaimana bisness leh jalan bila orang penting dari atas ke bawah suatu organisasi tu mati .. macamana nak preserve ilmu pengetahuan dari hilang pupus..

tu la yang Pak Lah dok jaja MODAL INSAN... smile.gif

OUTSOURCE lama dah.. dari zaman dulu lagi.. sedar tak selama ni kita outsource.. Contoh terdekat makan minum dulu kita masak buat sendiri ada yang tanam makanan sendiri tapi sekarang kebanyakannya dah outsource.. beli je senang smile.gif

Kenapa sekarang orang heboh out-source sebab IT baru je.. macam pelik nak outsource IT human resource etc tapi bila keadaan kompleks.. dan banyak beban maka adalah terbaik outsource kurangkan beban tingal bayar aje..

Ada pro and kontra dalam hal ni.. dari segi pengawalan kuasa privasi.. dan macam2 lagi kena pertimbangkan.. tak semudah membuat keputusan dalam hal2 ni..

Banyak organisasi besar dah outsource contoh motorola.. dan pecah dan outsource sebahagian induk operasi dia.. banyak lagi company yang buat..

so bukan dalam k-ekonomi aje benda outsource nih..
get the BIG picture... smile.gif





new TERM new ERA.. smile.gif basically the concept is the same.. biggrin.gif

#17 Jagermeist_

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Posted 08 August 2006 - 05:59 PM

Woho...relax there son..such animosity...don't take it out in the forum...its just plain text...let's do it on the rugby field smile.gif.
As mentioned before,Knowledge is the main ingredients in Knowledge Economy,specialization to core functions is the concept and out-sourcing to a company that specialize in the function is practicality.
Outsourcing though have long existed,and with respect to the K-Economy,get's a new limelight with goverment incentives e.g tax free zones...our very own *clap* *clap* MSC (sic),foriegn talents hiring,and other business friendly policies to help spruce it. Example,the goverment overright BAFIA (Banking and Financial Institution Act) and allowed 2 foriegn company to handle more efficiently the IT of 2 major banks. With thier core expertise,they can do the job a lot cheaper and more efficiently since they are focus and specialize in that field while the this frees the bank and allow it to develope and add value to thier core business,banking.
What is the main ingredient of K-Economy?
People.
At what point of time does the 'people' begin thier indoctrine to be a Knowledge Worker?
From the point of thier first formal education (primary,secondary,college) and beyond thier working life. The process of learning,un-learning and re-learning.
So,education is the most crucial part in generating the K-Economy. Knowledge savvy people turns into knowledge savvy worker who creates value and also knowledge savvy consumers.
The question should be,why would K-Economy be a failure or lagging behind other economies like Singapore,Korea,Hong Kong or Taiwan...Asian...let's not look at the causcasian counterparts like Australia. Because our based line is weak,the education system is in dire need of a complete over-haul or revamp totally.
The education system neither prepares the future Knoweldge Worker for the challenges in the new economy nor does it makes him a complete person. For further explanantion,please refer to Bakri M. Musa 'Malaysia in the Era of Globalization' and 'An Education Worthy of Malaysia'.
We can't even get the local graduate to be accepted by the industry and they are available by the thousands (truckloads),and the goverment is still harping on K-Economy? Now,I would personally be telling them 'Get real'.

#18 obelicks

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Posted 08 August 2006 - 10:28 PM

QUOTE(Jagermeist @ Aug 8 2006, 05:59 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
We can't even get the local graduate to be accepted by the industry and they are available by the thousands (truckloads),and the goverment is still harping on K-Economy? Now,I would personally be telling them 'Get real'.


Well if we can manage knowledge effect we don't need more than we need.. (graduates) smile.gif ..
they're overloaded... univ has to change them.. or they have to change themselves.. as usual we will follow the wave.. and actually it can't be controlled and predict.. so.. let see what will happen..

i not seen we're in k-economy yet.. as far as the term define.. still far away.. e-economy maybe..

Outsource is normal.. many thing can be outsource to be efficiency... but there risk.. pro and cons which have to be analyze carefully...

#19 rizal

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Posted 08 August 2006 - 11:21 PM

Jagermeist,
I have to agree with you with regards to the later effect of delaying knowledge-based economy to the country . We can see how efficiency played the role to say like once a small operator in a small country SG- Singtel who is now become such a big name in telco in the region. And also how Maxis can lead the telco market in Malaysia compared to the older player.
(hey I work in this industry!)

But what would you suggest the gov should do to our system?
They said they already spent millions of RM for those IT training scheme to educate graduates to prepare for the so called K-economy .

p/s You have to accept the fact that people are more interested to talk about Dato' K rather than the K-Economy itself smile.gif

#20 obelicks

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Posted 09 August 2006 - 09:01 AM

Dato K is more well Known than K-ecomomy la rizal smile.gif

not many people know and understand what is k-economy...
it's not draft in wawasan 2020 not sure pak lah will continue the wawasan 2020 biggrin.gif not seen any stress on wawasan 2020..

we can predit and plan on what will be going on for next few years..but for sure we will not know what will really happen..

many factor to success.. we need to understand and learn from it.. learn the success criteria...

#21 Jagermeist_

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Posted 14 August 2006 - 10:56 AM

QUOTE(rizal @ Aug 8 2006, 11:21 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Jagermeist,
I have to agree with you with regards to the later effect of delaying knowledge-based economy to the country . We can see how efficiency played the role to say like once a small operator in a small country SG- Singtel who is now become such a big name in telco in the region. And also how Maxis can lead the telco market in Malaysia compared to the older player.
(hey I work in this industry!)

But what would you suggest the gov should do to our system?
They said they already spent millions of RM for those IT training scheme to educate graduates to prepare for the so called K-economy .

p/s You have to accept the fact that people are more interested to talk about Dato' K rather than the K-Economy itself smile.gif


Bila ko tengok the reality,macam tersangatlah jauh jek...nak sampai from zero to 10.
Kalau gomen kira balik Return on Investment for IT Training scheme...probably less than 25%...my very conservative estimate.

The root cause and for change to take place is not to train the students when they have left school,i.e University...but while they are still in school. The archaic education system of KBSR,KBSM... 3M..membaca mengira menulis has to be REVAMP...and not just review. If we take a look at developed status countries like Singapore,Taiwan,Korea...(amik example Asian,kang amik Causcasian macam Australia and NZ orang ckp 'itu Australia...diorang boleh la...')they have a solid education system which encompass a students education as a whole.

A K-Economy is not about buying more servers,having 10,000 IT technical workforce or merely laying down fibre cables of 10 megs,it's about the society too. The society needs to be K-mature and K-Aware and also K-friendly.

However,the reality is...people are not K-friendly or K-mature...and our local university is a mass-producer of paper grads that makes headlines in newspapers 'UxM melahirkan 20,000 graduan..bla bla...kata Tan Sri xxx...Naib Canselor .... sewaktu majlis konvokasi yang mewah dan penuh adat istiadat'. But what does our local U give back to the industry? Can they give themselves pat on the back because thier research and developement has been widely used by the industry the likes of MIT or CMU labs? That's why I have very little respect for our local academician,they just talk and talk out of empthy glory...but have nothing to show. For them,its just a title race... Bsc...Msc...Phd by 26? What gives? What glory does what achieve by walking around with Phd but has nothing to contribute?

So,back to the Career in the K-Economy...it's dark and bleak.

#22 obelicks

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 11:57 AM

we're not k-aware yet so it's not k-mature or k-friendly indeed..

there are step need to be taken care to acomplish te "k"
- by Goverment..
- by educator
- bt students
- by employee
- by employer..

Since this topic is for merely for Opensource in K.. so better put in another topic focus on k-economy...

#23 kkmka90

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 01:00 PM

QUOTE
For them,its just a title race... Bsc...Msc...Phd by 26? What gives? What glory does what achieve by walking around with Phd but has nothing to contribute?
So true. Their title is their commodity, not their knowledge.

QUOTE
we're not k-aware yet so it's not k-mature or k-friendly indeed..


True. The general public doesnt really understand about this.


Mindset of getting degrees and working in big companies have to change.

#24 Jagermeist_

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 01:34 PM

QUOTE(kkmka90 @ Aug 16 2006, 01:00 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
So true. Their title is their commodity, not their knowledge.
True. The general public doesnt really understand about this.
Mindset of getting degrees and working in big companies have to change.


It's a choice,so they CHOOSE not to understand.

What has to change is the mindset of the paper chase (dip,degrees,Masters,Phd).

These papers are not an end to itself,it is a mean to others avenues.

A student should grasp the knowledge along the way from the day he enrolled till the day he graduates,not

restricted only to classroom and lecture halls,but on the field while he's representing his university or in a

science fair.

It is the learning-process that should be put in perspective,not getting the paper on convo day and taking

picture with mom and dad. What's the point of having a picture taken on graduation day with mom and

dad,framing it on the wall to let everyone else see it but you're still jobless after 12 months from the

graduation day despite being top in the batch? Sounds familliar?

#25 obelicks

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 01:45 PM

come back to mindset & research value

#26 Jagermeist_

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 02:02 PM

Here's an interesting article which will give you an insight of why Malaysia's K-Economy or MSC is has move further away from being realized...
ph34r.gif
Malaysia's distant 2020 vision

By Ioannis Gatsiounis
Asia Times Online

The bell tolls in Malaysia in 2020, the deadline the United Malays National Organization-led government has given itself to deliver the Southeast Asian country from developing- to developed-world status.

Former authoritarian leader Mahathir Mohamad launched the ambitious campaign in 1991, which aimed broadly to create a progressive scientific society and position Malaysia as a regional hub for leading innovative technology companies. The stepping stone of that plan was the establishment of the Multimedia Super Corridor (MSC), unveiled in 1996 as Malaysia's answer to Silicon Valley, which includes a 728-hectare futuristic "intelligent garden" city known as Cyberjaya. The government project is expected eventually to cost US$5.3 billion and usher Malaysia into the information age.

Malaysia was arguably in a better position to take the leap than most developing countries. After years of rapid manufacturing-led growth, its infrastructure was nearly world-class. Regionally, the levels of the country's gross domestic product and education were higher than most of its neighbors'. Oil and gas production was providing handsome revenues that could be used to spark technology-oriented spending.

To Mahathir, the MSC and Cyberjaya, which in Malay translates to "cyber success", seemed a visionary, win-win proposition.

Nowadays, nothing informs Malaysia's sense of success or failure more than the fate of its high-tech sector. Yet it's becoming increasingly clear that the country's so-called 2020 vision is fast falling out of focus. Malaysia now lags behind both China's and India's science and technology sectors, and regional rivals Singapore and Thailand now attract more foreign direct investment. Even Malaysia's political leaders have at times lamented the country's "first-class infrastructure, but third-class mentality".

Nor has private-sector innovation taken off to the degree first envisaged by government policymakers. To the contrary, the glaring lack of home-grown technology firms means that holders of information and technology degrees currently make up about 20% of Malaysia's unemployed university graduates, who apparently lack the knowledge and skills needed to compete in the global technology marketplace.

When the government has tried to fill the private-sector gap, it has often missed the mark. The government's pet Information Communication Technology projects, including the Smart School Project, the Worldwide Manufacturing Web and Borderless Marketing Flagships, have all flopped because of mismanagement, overspending and poor execution, critics say. There are recent reports claiming that as many as 90% of state-led ICT startups have gone belly-up, according to Technopreneur Association of Malaysia president Farith Rithaudeen.

That poor record has been a drag on the entire science and technology sector, souring private-sector sentiment and drying up the venture-capital funding for other so-called technopreneurial pursuits, including the startup ICT ventures that should be leading the country up the value-added information-technology ladder.

Consider, for instance, the case of Sentinel Technology, a small Malaysia-based research-and-development-oriented ICT firm. Mohamad Asendy, the startup's chief executive officer, said his company recently developed new anti-piracy software that he contends has the capacity to become a global market leader.

The company even held discussions with Microsoft's Malaysia division, which according to Asendy was duly impressed with the innovation and encouraged Sentinel to divulge how the technology works so that Microsoft technicians could test its effectiveness.

Asendy said he preferred first to formalize legal protection for his firm's innovation, but he lacked the RM300,000 (US$81,500) he needed to apply for a US patent. The Malaysian government offered him a RM50,000 grant, Asendy said, but in efforts to land the additional funding needed for the requisite marketing, accounting and legal requirements to apply for the patent, he was frequently asked in exchange to give up a majority stake in the intellectual property.

When he tried to obtain further government funding to patent his innovation, he was first directed to the Internal Affairs Ministry, which after a long wait redirected him to the Science, Technology and Innovation Ministry, he said. From there, he was told he would first have to get MSC status before he could apply for funding. The innovation, many months later, still is not legally protected.

Government hindrances
The government is often at the root of Malaysia's innovation problems, scientific surveys say. A Global Entrepreneurship Monitor, a worldwide research project to be released soon that aims to describe and analyze entrepreneurship processes, recently surveyed 45 local ICT experts and 2,000 Malaysian nationals about the country's entrepreneurial environment.

The study's results reflected poorly on the government's performance, claiming that its policies disfavor new firms, and that government bureaucracy and regulation and licensing requirements impede new firms from expanding. It raised doubts about the government's competence and effectiveness in supporting new and growing firms. The study singled out the lack of financial support, quality of education and training, and overall market openness as other main factors holding back Malaysian entrepreneurs.

For all these discouragements, however, Prime Minister Abdullah Badawi's government is not abandoning his predecessor's high-stakes, high-tech dream. In part, that's because it's impossible to brush the ambitious scheme under the rug. Wired with high-speed fiber optics, the MSC spans a whopping 777 square kilometers.

Moreover, the government has poured billions of dollars into the MSC's infrastructure and provided huge tax breaks to companies that have agreed to locate there. Meanwhile, Abdullah, who on the whole has demonstrated a disdain for the profligate megaprojects favored by Mahathir, has nonetheless reaffirmed his government's commitment, some say blindly, to all matters high-tech.

For instance, the Ninth Malaysia Plan (2006-10), the country's recently minted economic-policy blueprint, allocates RM1.5 billion to technology-oriented schemes, a 40% increase from the previous plan. One of the plan's main thrusts is "to raise the capacity for knowledge and innovation and nurture first-class mentality". The document is spangled with terms such as "knowledge-based", "science", "innovation" and "research and development".

To be sure, there have been some bright spots on Malaysia's ICT horizon. In May, US technology giant Dell announced it would set up a technology and development center in Cyberjaya. The center will focus on various value-added projects, including software design, and employ up to 1,000 workers.

Narayanan Kanan, senior vice president of the development division of the Multimedia Development Corp (MDeC), the agency tasked with overseeing and directing the MSC, said the Dell deal was a positive development - though he played down any suggestion that such major foreign investments were out of the ordinary. About 1,500 companies currently have MSC status and as many as 10 new ICT-innovating companies are being added to the corridor's roster each week, he said.

However, critics contend that Kanan's assessment is overly rosy and glosses over some of the hard-market realities looming over the MSC's long-term viability, which if not quickly addressed could eventually spell doom for the entire multibillion-dollar enterprise. They contend that many of the foreign MSC-registered companies have established centers here for basic distribution purposes rather than innovative pursuits.

The country's ICT sector is suffering from various "market failures", including a severe shortage of seed-funding and so-called angel investors, said Nazrin Hassan, an adviser to the Technopreneurs Association of Malaysia.

Hassan contends there are about seven times as many venture capitalists providing startup funding for technopreneurial ventures in neighboring Singapore. "In order to see growth in technopreneurs you have to take chances [with funding]. Many [Malaysian] technopreneurs have died off waiting for seed funding."

Meanwhile, Malaysia's education system requires a serious overhaul to spur the sort of innovation needed to move Malaysia up the ICT value-added ladder. As in many Asian countries, the Malaysian school system emphasizes rote learning and quantitative rather than qualitative education, critics say.

"We have not developed a capacity for lateral thinking," said Kuala Lumpur-based educationalist F R Bhupalan. "We have straitjacketed our students and not allowed them to engage in meaningful analysis."

The situation is exacerbated by draconian legislation, such as the Universities and University Colleges Act, which requires incoming university students to take a pledge to the government and bars them from joining political parties. Fear and feudalistic deference have long infected Malaysia's education system, experts say, and in turn the classroom often punishes rather than rewards creative thinking and risk-taking.

Nor has education funding always been well targeted. For instance, the government recently invested RM300 million on a Smart School program for 80 schools, which broadly aimed to center education on ICT. About 60% of the project's funding went toward hardware, and procurements were frequently smeared with allegations of mismanagement and misappropriation.

"Many ICT contracts were awarded to the wrong people, some with no experience or reputation, but with the right connections," said Chris Chan, chief executive officer of TMS, a Cyberjaya-based Internet company. "We have high tech visualized nicely - the implementation's been flawed."

That raises hard questions about the viability of about 500 new education-oriented projects detailed in the Ninth Malaysian Plan.

Changing tech tack
The Badawi administration is reacting to the criticism. For instance, this year the government replaced MDeC's chief executive officer with industry insider Badlisham Ghazali, the previous director and general manager of Hewlett-Packard in Malaysia, who has more than 18 years of ICT-related work experience. Rumors abound that more key MDeC posts will be filled with industry players rather than crusty bureaucrats.

If true, such moves could make a big difference, said Chan, who for one doesn't buy the notion that Malaysia's small talent crop - its total population is a mere 24 million - poses a major problem to becoming a global ICT leader.

"You don't need that many people to produce positive change," Chan said. "Appointing qualified, successful enterprisers rather than government appointees is a positive first step."

Kanan acknowledged that the government is trying to change its old tack. Government policymakers have recently narrowed their previous broad focus down to six strategic ICT areas, including software and hardware design, creative multimedia contents, shared solutions and outsourcing, he said.

The government intends to roll out the MSC to other areas of the country and offer new, juicier incentives to attract more multinational corporations, Chan said.

MDeC communicates regularly with the Education Ministry concerning what kind of graduates the industry requires, Kanan said. The ministry declined to comment on what specific policy steps it has recently taken to encourage more creativity and innovation among ICT students.

Efforts to improve funding for startups, including three funds of undisclosed amounts pertaining to science, technology and innovation, have recently been established by the government, but were hardly enough to create the critical mass of technology-oriented ventures needed to realize the government's 2020 vision, Kanan said.

But critics say most of the government's plans lack concrete details, suggesting that it is paying lip service to the overwhelming need to change the venture's focus fundamentally. They suggest detailed plans for creating better linkages between local universities and the ICT industry. That would ensure curriculum meets industry standards and requirements, allowing foreign investors easier access to strategic tie-ups with local firms and encouraging the government to invest in more locally produced ICT software and hardware, which are all badly needed.

Currently, the government accounts for about 80% of Malaysia's total annual ICT consumption, the project's advocates note. And, they argue, Malaysia has in the past performed admirably with its back against the economic wall, particularly during the 1997-98 Asian financial crisis, which Malaysia handled its own way and arguably weathered better than its neighbors.

Until now, a certain mix of talent, pragmatism and will power has enabled Malaysia to develop beyond expectations. Excelling in the ultra-competitive ICT industry, though, will likely require something extra, a formula Malaysia is still grasping for. But it's becoming increasingly clear that the private sector, rather than the government, should be leading the country's ambitious drive into the brave, new global information age.

Ioannis Gatsiounis, a New York native, is a Kuala Lumpur-based writer and previously co-hosted a weekly political/cultural radio call-in show in the US.

#27 asklinux

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Posted 05 April 2007 - 09:05 AM

aku nak mintak tolong niee ...

sesiapa ada peluang kerja (Aku nak carikan untuk abang aku nie) dia diploma dalam pengurusan perniagaan , umur dlm 33 tahun ..

dulu pernah berniaga tapi masa gawat syarikat dia dgn rakan kongsinya tutup(perniagaan hartanah). skrg nie dia kerja tak menentu ...aku kesian kat dia , nak saport anak + bini lagi ..

kalau sesiapa leh tolong ...kalau boleh area melaka / ipoh ....tapi kalau dah tak de yang lain pun boleh la gak

tolong la ye ...aku kesian sungguh kat dia ...

kalau ada email aku di

viva999 (at) yahoo.com

#28 yonie_83

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Posted 03 October 2009 - 07:47 PM

View Postasklinux, on 05 April 2007 - 09:05 AM, said:

aku nak mintak tolong niee ...

sesiapa ada peluang kerja (Aku nak carikan untuk abang aku nie) dia diploma dalam pengurusan perniagaan , umur dlm 33 tahun ..

dulu pernah berniaga tapi masa gawat syarikat dia dgn rakan kongsinya tutup(perniagaan hartanah). skrg nie dia kerja tak menentu ...aku kesian kat dia , nak saport anak + bini lagi ..

kalau sesiapa leh tolong ...kalau boleh area melaka / ipoh ....tapi kalau dah tak de yang lain pun boleh la gak

tolong la ye ...aku kesian sungguh kat dia ...

kalau ada email aku di

viva999 (at) yahoo.com


#29 yonie_83

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Posted 03 October 2009 - 07:48 PM

ingat k-ekonomy is kegawatan ekonomy.hahha

#30 Jagermeist

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Posted 26 August 2010 - 12:21 PM

It's ironic, and teruja jugak aku, mula2 aku baca posting Rizal dated 8 years ago, and 4 years before that was the launch of MSC.
Now its 2010, 10 years before 2020, we're back to square 1. Knowledge Economy nya ke mana...IT Infra nye ke mana, knowledge workers pun takde, OSS punya revolution started in 2000 pun ntah kemana. Billions spend, billions gone. Now everyone is focusing on China and India. At one time, Malaysia was ranked no 10 in the world for E-Government effort, now we are not even in top 20. Singapore, Korea, Japan started about the same time as Malaysia, but we're still at the starting line figuring out tecnic and tactic to run the race while the competitors are already at home resting and preparing for the next competition.

Some hard to swallow facts:
1. Public servant or orang gomen totals about 1 million plus for 27 million
2. Broadband penetration is below 50%
3. Salary is still below Developed country status
4. Technology import precede technology export

Few months back, our gahmen introduce GTP headed by Idris Jala's PEMANDU, NKRA and NKEA...too much acronym, too much to digest. Basically, the gahmen is starting an intitative to collect inputs and feedbacks on number of issues Public Transport, Technology & Innovation, Education, Security etc.Jadi buruh kasar...no money was given, GTP labs bagi makan breakfast and lunch..tapi nak suruh 3 bulan dok dalam 'labs', fikir masaalah negara.

Seriously, nothing new come up, and I could have read the same ideas that was shared in the labs some 15 years ago masa mula2 MSC start. The Technology labs, yg datang...IBM ada...MAMPU ada...Telco's, Banks....Hi Tech companies...even idola OSS g33ks Malaya...master OSS wannabe Dinesh Nair :lol:. The findings will be disclose lepas raya nanti but here's some things that they found:

1. WiMax is dead, going for LTE. Bye-bye P1...Intel drop it, betting on LTE.
2. Single payment gateway for all transaction is needed, hence an electronic clearing house is imminent
3. Central or Federated Identity mandated by the government required

and others.

Basically, we are going back to the drawing board. All those big words like K-Economy, K-Worker, K-World, K-Army etc was never there. What Malaysia did was went on a computer buying spree, that's as far as it went since 1996 to 2006, 10 tahun beli computer beli server, pasang fibre optics. But, no knowledge generated, no innovation or creation and worst did not even add value to the citizen at large.

Nanti bila GTP buat open-day, please come...and share your thoughts or whack 'em till kingdom come. Basically, we're screwed as a nation.

#31 ed_thix

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Posted 28 August 2010 - 05:22 AM

View PostJagermeist, on 26 August 2010 - 12:21 PM, said:

--snip--
Nanti bila GTP buat open-day, please come...and share your thoughts or whack 'em till kingdom come. Basically, we're screwed as a nation.

Welcome to the club of doom. Seriously I agree with Jag.

Regarding our so called NKRAs, PEMANDU and all other fancy acronyms - http://blogs.reuters...a-reform-drive/

#32 hakmal

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Posted 19 August 2012 - 10:43 PM

cite pasal k-economy? hanya sekadar ilusi dan khayalan a.k.a teoritical sahaja...untuk di Malaysia. Praktikal.......ke laut arr..





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